5 Simple Steps To Prepare Content For Translation

Posted by Dynamic Language Jul 10, 2017

Many factors result in a successful, quality translation project and one of the most important factors is the preparation and information gathering by the client, before providing source content to their language service provider.

Before the translation process can even begin, it is vital that the customer adequately prepares the translation project request. Your language service provider (LSP) will need detailed instructions to produce an accurate translation.

Wondering where to begin? Just follow these 5 simple steps to prepare content for translation! 

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Topics: Localization, Translation

Benefits of a Terminology Glossary and Style Guide

Posted by Dynamic Language Jul 7, 2017

A translation style guide is a set of rules for how your company presents itself textually and visually. Think of it as a guidebook for your language service provider (LSP) that includes rules for voice, writing style, sentence structure, and terminology.

A terminology glossary contains the building blocks for your website content. It’s a database containing key terminology used by your company and customers and their approved translations in all target languages.

 

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Topics: Transcreation, Localization, Translation, Marketing

Universal Spanish Translation: Top 10 Myths

Posted by Dynamic Language Apr 18, 2017

Although we know that producing translations that are localized as specifically as possible can be fruitful, many people find it may not be realistic to have their project localized for all of the different varieties of Spanish spoken in different locales. In 2010, Spanish was ranked number two in terms of number of native speakers worldwide, falling second only to Mandarin.

There are many different countries with Spanish speakers, and oftentimes, a company may want to release its product to an audience that spans across many of these different locales. While each area has a different dialect and therefore could require specific changes in the finalized, localized product, it is not always within someone’s budget to go through this process each time for every locale, and therefore, may pose the question, “Is there a universal Spanish I can use? Something everyone will understand?” The answer to this is both “yes” and “no” and may also depend on the text.

Universal Spanish can be a challenge, given all the different local expressions and variations in the Spanish language. Specifically, it uses more generic terminology and avoids the use of colloquial and more informal phrases that vary from country to country. It also takes into account terminology and phrases that may be considered offensive in certain countries.

Here are ten universal Spanish myths:

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Topics: Language, Translation

A Demographic Look at Spanish Speakers in the U.S.

Posted by Dynamic Language Mar 21, 2017

Recent estimates place the number of Spanish speakers in the U.S. at over 50 million, coming second only to Mexico. The caveat for companies trying to tap into this huge market is understanding that while Spanish speakers in the US share a common language, the subtle nuances in dialect can play a huge role. These differences are most closely tied to the speaker’s country of origin, and in the melting pot of the USA, this makes knowing the geographic distribution of Latinos by national origin hugely important. While we can group multiple nationalities under the term Latino or Hispanic, it doesn’t mean that they are all the same, and language is one of the most important aspects of their culture.

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Topics: Translation

Google Announces Real-Time Translation with GBoard

Posted by Dynamic Language Mar 14, 2017

Google has announced several upgrades to it's new Android keyboard. The Gboard now has the ability to do automatic translation. As you type, the new Google Translate integration will translate text in real time as you type it in. 

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Topics: Language, Translation, Communication, Technology, Mobile Application, Global

Microsoft Uses Neutral Spanish to Sell Their Products

Posted by Dynamic Language Feb 13, 2017

Because Spanish is spoken so widely across the world, there are actually several standardized Spanish variants. Some of the most common include Latin American Spanish, US Spanish, and European Spanish.

Neutral Spanish

Neutral Spanish (as used by Microsoft) can be compared to ‘universal’ Spanish, in that it is designed to be understood by all Spanish speakers worldwide. The term doesn’t refer to any one specific dialect, but instead refers to the process of finding terms or expressions that would be best suited to a multinational audience. This means it lacks all the regionalisms, colloquialisms, and grammatical quirks that characterize a dialect and connect it to a specific culture or nation. The idea behind this neutral Spanish is commercial and not linguistic: as Microsoft products are marketed globally, it is cheaper to produce only one version of the product in Spanish.

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Topics: Translation, Spanish

Translating Latin American vs European Spanish: Top 10 Differences

Posted by Dynamic Language Nov 30, 2016

The most striking differences when comparing Latin American vs European Spanish come down to accent and pronunciation, but vocabulary and even grammar can be very different between the two. Here is our top ten list of the main differences.

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Topics: Translation, Spanish

The Evolving Language of Second Generation Immigrants

Posted by Dynamic Language Oct 27, 2016

Thanks to the hit 2004 Adam Sandler film, Spanglish, most people are familiar with the term and concept of "Spanglish," meaning a fusion of two languages that includes elements of both Spanish and English. Linguists are seeing an interesting phenomenon in second generation immigrants, which is especially prevalent in urban ethnic communities.

This "evolution of language" is often observed in second generation immigrants altering the sentence structure of their new community's language to mimic the language structure of their native tongue. For "Spanglish", grammatic rules within the family's native Spanish language are applied to their usage of English. And this is observed not just in immigrants to the United States, but all over the world.

For example, in Germany, if you wanted to mention that you were going to the movies tomorrow, you could say, “Ich gehe morgen ins Kino,” which directly translates to "I go tomorrow to the cinema." But children of urban immigrants will more commonly say “MorgenichgehKino”, which translates literally to "tomorrow I go cinema." Interestingly, this variation in language follows its own grammatical rules that can make it easier to learn. 

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Topics: Localization, Translation

The Complexity of Legal Translation

Posted by Dynamic Language Oct 12, 2016

Translation and practicing law are both very different vocations, but when it comes to the amount of flexibility that lawyers and translators have in the words they use, there is very little.  The word of the law is the word of the law – whether it’s in a statute, a contract, a patent, a confidentiality agreement or a witness statement; the law must be accurate in every language. Ensuring that legal terms are correct in the language they are being translated into is always vital, but sometimes challenging to achieve.

With the inherent complexity of the English language consider the difficulties in expressing English legal terms into other languages through translation.  There are cultural inconsistencies in legal translation that often come up.  English terms at times do not have offer direct translation in some languages.  For example, the Greek language offers no equivalent term for "fiduciary."  Should someone in your organization suggest machine translation  as a viable solution for legal translation, tell them to reconsider. 

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Topics: Translation, Legal

Professional Interpreters Can Help Reduce Hospital Costs - Avoid Errors

Posted by Dynamic Language Aug 25, 2016

A 9-year old Vietnamese girl suffering from an infection was rushed to the hospital by her parents and 16-year old brother. Her parents spoke primarily Vietnamese. The hospital failed to provide an interpreter at any point in the medical encounter, relying instead on the girl and her brother to interpret for the physician and parents.

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Topics: Interpretation, Language, Translation, Healthcare