One Sign Does Not Fit All for Sign Language

Posted by Dynamic Language Dec 15, 2017

Did you know American Sign Language is commonly said to be the fourth most-used language in the United States? While it is difficult to know exactly how many ASL speakers there are in the U.S., the estimation ranges from 500,000 to 2,000,000 speakers.

What many people do not realize is that there is not a single, universal dialect or version of sign language. Just as languages vary between countries and regions, so does sign language. In fact, more than 100 types of sign language exist!

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Topics: Interpretation, Sign Language, Language Service Provider

ASL Video Dictionary Offers Visual Learning Assistance

Posted by Rick Antezana Mar 2, 2015

American Sign Language (ASL) originated more than 200 years ago, is the 3rd most common language in the United States and is used by over 500,000 people in North America, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD).

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Topics: Language Learning, Sign Language, Communication

Interpreting concerts and music into American Sign Language

Posted by Audrey Dubois-Boutet Jun 3, 2011

Have you ever been at a conference, school event or presentation and found yourself riveted by the American Sign Language interpreter’s intricate hand and arm movements? Imagine seeing a song interpreted into ASL.

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Topics: Sign Language, Deaf

One size does not fit all for sign language

Posted by Audrey Dubois-Boutet Sep 14, 2010

Did you know American Sign Language is one of the most used languages in the United States? The 2000 census reported two million people in the country use this type of sign language to communicate. We can only imagine what the 2010 census will tell us!

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Topics: Sign Language, Deaf

Patent approved for Microsoft's Kinect motion sensor

Posted by Audrey Dubois-Boutet Aug 10, 2010

Gamers using Microsoft’s Xbox 360 may no longer need handheld controllers to play certain games, thanks to the company’s newly patented Kinect motion sensor. The technology is strangely reminiscent of “1984,” in which Big Brother—with the help of TVs—knew everything people were doing…but let’s not think about it that way. Instead, let’s focus on the benefits of the Kinect technology.

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Topics: Sign Language, Technology

Video Chat for iPhone 4

Posted by Audrey Dubois-Boutet Jun 8, 2010

Apple has finally released their highly anticipated iPhone 4. The new phone shows off a host of exciting features and a slick new style.

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Topics: Sign Language, Mobile Application

Technology grows for the hard of hearing

Posted by Audrey Dubois-Boutet Dec 30, 2009

In today’s society, almost every person owns a mobile phone. But for those who are deaf or hard of hearing, cell phones have largely limited them to text messaging only. Providers like T-mobile have long created data only plans on all their phones with keyboards to cater to this market. But technology is stepping it up!

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Topics: Sign Language, Deaf

Bridging Gaps in Emergency Preparedness

Posted by Audrey Dubois-Boutet Dec 2, 2009

Do you have a patient or client who is blind, deaf, hard of hearing or has limited use of their vision that has struggled with having proper accessibility in emergency situations? It is possible that they do not have access to resources on how to prepare when these disasters occur. Now you can assist!

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Topics: Sign Language, Deaf

Hear Me Sign

Posted by Audrey Dubois-Boutet Aug 6, 2009

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing community may soon have a new way to communicate with those that do not sign. The Institute for Disabilities Research and Training, Inc. (IDRTA) has been conducting research on a device called the AcceleGlove, a “sensor-instrumented glove that can capture motion and position of hand and fingers then input that data into a computer.”
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Topics: Sign Language, Deaf

ASL (American Sign Language): Different Essentials to Visual Language

Posted by Audrey Dubois-Boutet Sep 9, 2008

Did you know that there are several different styles or methods of ASL (American Sign Language) that can be used for the Deaf culture and Hard of Hearing? It is easy to think that ASL (American Sign Language) covers the complete visual language for this social group, but based upon the background of an individual, their preferences and needs might extend beyond visual signing. They may need Oral Interpreting, Close Signing, Tactile Signing or a combination of several in order to fully understand a conversation. Understanding your client’s needs and their preferred style can be a very important step. Different styles aid to different individuals and their preference of retrieving information. Knowing the key essentials of ASL can render a new light for you and your client. Check out the differences below.

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Topics: Sign Language, Deaf