How to Sell Your Product Globally

Posted by Dynamic Language May 18, 2015

Your brand and retail product is taking the country by storm. Now you want to expand your company into a foreign market. Congratulations! Now, how do you do that? How to take your product to new global markets and maintain a prominent brand presence on a global scale without losing sight of your customers as individuals with their own specific needs? How do you communicate with your customers across different countries and languages? Here are a few top tips for how to sell your product globally.

Localized Presence

The further away you are from a situation, the less likely it is that you will be in touch with what’s going on. The same is true for taking a retail product global. To maintain a successful presence in a country where you would like to offer your product, it’s important to have people specifically designated to deal with your products in that country and keep your customers happy. They don’t necessarily have to be located in that country, but they should be intimately familiar with the culture, language, and customs in order to communicate effectively with your customers there.

You should also have a version of your website that’s specifically designed for each country. Apart from basic translation, you will need to make sure prices are listed in the proper currency and adjusted for current exchange rates. In addition, you need to be aware of what payment methods are common in each country so that you can accommodate your customers, rather than turning them off by forcing them to use a method they wouldn’t ordinarily use.

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Topics: Localization, Translation, Marketing, Globalization, Retail Industry, Retail, business

Do Your Labels Translate? Regulatory Requirements for Food Packaging and the Need for Translation Services

Posted by Dynamic Language May 11, 2015

If you’re selling food, it’s very important to properly label all ingredients, nutritional information, etc. What does that entail? Well, it depends on what market you’re selling in. At the end of last year, the European Union enacted strict legislation regarding how food is labeled. This means that when exporting food products to be sold in Europe, you need to make sure they comply with those regulations. It also means that all of these new labels need to be properly translated.

Nutritional Information Requirements

Previously, providing specific nutritional values for foods was completely voluntary in Europe. Some companies added it for customer convenience, whereas others simply labeled foods as healthy or unhealthy, using the symbol of red and green traffic lights. And plenty of food products had no nutritional labels at all.

However, as of December 2014, the EU requires that a variety of nutritional facts, including fat and salt content, carbohydrates, and more, be displayed on all pre-packaged foods in order to keep consumers better informed and combat rising obesity levels.

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Topics: Translation, Globalization, International Markets, Retail Industry, Retail

How Retail Translation Differs from Other Types of Translation Services

Posted by Dynamic Language May 8, 2015

Translation services are very important in the retail industry. If you want your business to succeed on an international scale, then your website, as well as all of your packaging, marketing materials, and labels will need to be translated into all of the different languages that your consumers speak. Perhaps surprisingly, retail translation is distinct from other types of translation services. You’ll need to work with a company that specializes in retail translation and can provide you with what you need. Here are some of the ways retail translation differs from other types of translation services.


Volume and Timeliness

In the retail industry, there’s a large amount of material that must be translated. Consider the variety of content your company publishes: product packaging, catalogs, coupons, emails, and blogs. Plus, if you have brick and mortar stores, there are signs, employee training materials, POS materials, and much more.

In addition, there is a very quick turnaround time. Catalogs and coupons are time-sensitive, and must be fully translated and ready to distribute in time for customers to take advantage of them. Blogs and emails may be released weekly, or even more frequently. Even product packaging and label translation is usually the last step before going to print, and by then, time is of the essence! All of these materials must be translated quickly and accurately, not only for your customers to understand, but so they will ultimately want to buy your products.

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Topics: Localization, Translation, Marketing, International Markets, Retail Industry, Retail

4 Tips for Translation of Retail Websites

Posted by Dynamic Language May 5, 2015

You’re preparing to expand your company into a new foreign market. One of the things you need is to have your website translated, or localized, into different languages, so that local customers in those countries can navigate with ease. You figure it’s a fairly simple task: simply compile the text from your current website and run it through Google Translate, and you’ll be all set, right?

Not even close. Even if machine translation could offer a perfect, word-for-word translation of your content (which it can’t), there are many more factors to consider when translating your site besides just the words on the screen. Here are four points to consider when localizing retail websites for foreign markets.

1. Currency and Payment Options – It’s important to make sure that the prices of all your products are converted into the appropriate currency for the country where they’re being sold, whether in Euros, Rubles, Yen, etc. But more than that, you need to consider different payment options in different countries and regions. In the U.S., you may handle most of your transactions through PayPal, but that may not be as popular in Germany or China, for instance. Become familiar with the popular payment options in the country and accommodate your customers in that region who prefer to pay by those methods.
 

2. Fulfillment – How will you ship your product to your customers? Will you ship internationally, or have local shipping facilities in each country? If you’re shipping internationally, what are the extra international shipping costs, and what customs fees or import duties are applicable? If you don’t inform your customers in advance, they’re likely to be surprised when checkout time comes around, and the extra costs could be problematic. If you’re shipping locally, what shipping service will you use? What services are available/popular in the area, and are they reliable for getting the customer their product in a timely manner?
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Topics: Website Localization, Translation, Marketing, Content, Retail Industry, Retail