Localize Your Facebook Ad Copy

Posted by Dynamic Language Feb 6, 2017

Social media has transformed globalization, bringing people together from around the world to share experiences and information — and it isn’t just individuals making connections. Innovative businesses are using social media marketing to promote products to an international audience with great success. Many find that Facebook is the clear leader in advanced solutions for companies of all sizes.

From audience insights to performance metrics, Facebook’s tools have made it possible for organizations to connect with consumers on every continent. As of September 30, 2016, the site had 1.79 billion active users — 84.9 percent of whom are outside the United States and Canada. When creating Facebook ads, targeted parameters for audience segmentation is critical.  These parameters then allow you to localize your facebook ad copy and images that will resonate with the target audience of specific loocale. It is important to understand that ad copy that targets millennials in Seattle, WA, when translated, may not resonate when shown to millennials in the UK.

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Topics: Advertising, Marketing, Globalization

Harry Potter and the Translator's Nightmare

Posted by Dynamic Language Dec 9, 2016

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Topics: Advertising, Marketing, Globalization, Content, Branding, Global Market, Global, World, Trends, entertainment

Why You Need a Language Services Company: Translations Gone Wrong

Posted by Dynamic Language Apr 24, 2015

The idea is an exciting one to think about: you are translating your brand's marketing materials into a new language so that you can reach an entirely new set of customers in a different part of the world.

Although your mind might be on the tremendous growth that could result from this expansion, you also need to remember there are several key steps that must be addressed for successful translation:
• You need to understand any informal slang or colloquialisms that might relate to your company and its products or services
• You must ensure that you have local help in the new market
• You must think about the political implications of your marketing efforts


These might seem like common sense requirements to some, but you would be surprised how many companies, even major brands, have flubbed these steps.

What happens if you make a mistake involving one of these concepts? Unfortunately, we don't need to imagine the consequences: there are plenty of real life examples of embarrassing, offensive international marketing failures that wise marketers can learn from.

Translations Gone Wrong: How NOT to Localize Your Brand

Many companies have experienced challenges localizing their marketing materials, but few have failed as spectacularly as these major brands. The missteps of these companies should provide some understanding of why your business needs professional translation help.

Coors: Turn it Loose!

In the 1980s, the Coors beer company was promoting an advertising campaign centered on a “Beerwolf” character. The slogan that went along with the Beerwolf character was "Turn it Loose!" Unfortunately, someone at Coors didn't do their homework on proper translations: in Spanish, the ad campaign was perceived as "suffer from diarrhea." Not the most appealing way to promote a refreshing beverage.

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Topics: Transcreation, Translation, Advertising, Marketing, International Markets

Cultural Whisperers: How the Biggest Brands Do Global Marketing

Posted by Dynamic Language Apr 13, 2015

The biggest brands today did not grow to become successful by staying in a single market.

However, prominent brands face their own unique challenges when it comes to global marketing. Let’s look at a few of the most recognizable brands in the world, the challenges they successfully overcame, and what agencies can learn from them.

Airbnb

Airbnb is a sort of Craigslist for travelers; people who are looking for a place to stay in a new city but don't want to book a traditional hotel can browse Airbnb’s listings to find a room, cottage, guest house, or couch for their travels. Those who are interested in renting out part of their living space can place a listing on the site to entice travelers.

Since its inception in San Francisco in 2008, Airbnb has seen tremendous growth. In 2011 alone, it experienced 425% growth in France, 719% in Spain, and 946% in Italy. How did they go from the startup phase to nearly 1000% growth in a completely foreign market in only three years? Some of this growth can be attributed to social media and the global connections forged by the rise of the Internet.

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Topics: Advertising, Marketing, Content, business

Key Trends in International Marketing

Posted by Dynamic Language Apr 10, 2015

International marketing trends have changed significantly over recent years. Thanks to the advent of the Information Age, today's global marketplace is more connected than ever before. It is this connectedness that has led to a major change in the way that international brands market themselves.


Companies that are looking to succeed in the new age of international marketing must be sure they are paying attention to how communications are changing. There are several factors that are having a huge impact on today's international marketers.

The Social Media Boom

In a relatively short amount of time, social media has exploded as a dominant communication channel in human culture. At the end of 2009, Facebook had 360 million monthly active users. Over the next four years, Facebook's user base more than tripled. The popular social media network reached 1.2 billion active users per month in 2013.

Social media has become one of the world's major international marketing trends because it has allowed brands to reach people in almost any location. Users can instantly connect to a brand that is on the other side of the world. Many major brands have leveraged this connectivity as a way to market to people in other parts of the world.

The luxury fashion brand Burberry, for example, had a relatively insignificant presence in China as recently as 2010. By launching a social media presence on Sina Weibo, one of China's top social networks, and continuously interacting with customers and exposing them to their brand, Burberry was able to become the number one selling fashion brand on several of China's top retail e-Commerce websites.

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Topics: Translation, Advertising, Marketing, Globalization, International Markets

6 Marketing Tips for International Branding

Posted by Dynamic Language Apr 7, 2015

Going international is a significant undertaking for any brand. While the rewards can be plentiful, there are also a lot of challenges involved when a business has a global market reach. One significant challenge to international branding is developing the collateral that is required to communicate with customers and prospects, to let them know about your organization and what it provides.

There are plenty of things to think about when it comes to creating collateral for international brands. Here are six of the top obstacles to this process.

Deciding between transcreation and translation

While translation is typically a more basic, literal method of converting content into a new language, transcreation refers to the process of re-creating the message of that collateral in a new language.

One great example of transcreation can be found in McDonald's popular advertising slogan from the early 2000s, "I'm loving it." The fast food conglomerate knew that they needed to ensure that the sentiment of this phrase stayed consistent around the world, so they decided to transcreate it in each international market that they wanted to enter. In Spain, for example, the slogan was translated as me encanta. While this Spanish phrase is actually closer to "I really like it," in English, McDonald's determined that this new phrase was more culturally relevant in Spanish.

Deciding between these two tactics can be difficult; transcreation usually results in a more accurate message for collateral pieces, but translation requires fewer resources.
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Topics: Transcreation, Language, Translation, Advertising, Marketing

What is Transcreation?

Posted by Dynamic Language Mar 5, 2015

Localization and transcreation are two “buzz words” in the language industry, and both services serve an important role for companies who want to communicate with customers in new regions across the globe. Depending on your needs, your marketing content may benefit from one technique more than the other, so let’s take a look at the differences between these two processes.


You’re likely already familiar with localization, which is defined as adapting an existing piece of content to make it understandable in a specific language and culture. Transcreation, on the other hand, is the process by which a product or advertising message is completely adapted for the target market, while still retaining the original intent. This requires a particularly creative approach, in order to truly resonate with international consumers.

In an earlier blog post, we shared a clever example of transcreation that highlighted Swedish car manufacturer Saab’s approach to advertising its line of convertibles back in the 1990s. The ad in the U.S. posed the comparison: “Saab vs. Oxygen bars,” since these trendy bars were popular in America at the time. When Saab “transcreated” the advertisement for potential customers in their home country of Sweden, the ad instead read: “Saab vs. Claustrophobia.” Despite that claustrophobia and oxygen bars conjure different images, you can see how the message is the same in each case: Saab convertibles offer fresh air and wide, open spaces. With transcreation, the literal meaning was changed for different markets, but the same messaging goal was achieved. Transcreation is particularly useful in addressing marketing challenges like these, with cultural-specific references or wordplay that are too difficult to translate directly into different languages.

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Topics: Transcreation, Localization, Language, Translation, Advertising, Marketing, Communication

Marketing Localization: Buyer Behavior in Global Markets

Posted by Dynamic Language Feb 24, 2015

The process of localizing your products and services for different countries and regions is critical to realizing the potential value of your target market. Market research company, Common Sense Advisory, has found that among global customers, “75% prefer to buy products in their native language”. North American companies have invested in targeted marketing strategies and expect revenues from foreign operations and sales to steadily increase in the future.

Localization’s Role in Marketing Strategy

When it comes to target markets, there are two elements required for successful communication: understanding exactly who your ideal buyer is, and learning how to reach them. This first part is usually handled by high-level sales and marketing strategists at your company who have thoroughly researched the locations of your target market. There are some important characteristics for deciding the key demographics: buyer’s age, job function, and understanding their biggest professional or personal challenges, etc.

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Topics: Localization, Translation, Advertising, Marketing